Submit primary research by September 1st, 2017 by 11:59 p.m. to be considered for the Fall 2017 cycle. September 1st is the priority deadline for article proposal submissions. The final deadline for article proposals is September 5th.

The Harvard Undergraduate Research Journal (THURJ) is the only Harvard College publication that showcases peer-reviewed undergraduate research from all disciplines. A biannual publication, thurj provides a comprehensive forum for discourse on cutting-edge research. thurj welcomes submissions throughout the year, but authors must meet the advertised deadline to be considered for publication in the upcoming issue. Submit using the form below. We also detail our submissions procedure below.

General Submission Procedure

  • Prepare manuscript files according to the submission guidelines below.
  • Fill out the submission form (link above).

Submission Guidelines for Primary Research

Eligibility

  • Primary author must be a Harvard College undergraduate.
  • Submitted manuscript concerns original research.
  • Submitted manuscript cannot be published or undergoing review in another research journal (undergraduate or otherwise).
  • Primary author must be willing to work with thurj editors in revising the submission if it is selected or seriously considered for publication.
  • Author(s) must consent to publication if their manuscript is selected for publication.

Manuscript Preparation Formatting

  • Submission may not exceed 30 pages, including all figures/tables and references. If additional space is needed, please prepare a Supplementary Materials document containing additional accompanying text, figures, and tables.
  • Manuscript should be double spaced with 12 point font and standard margins.
  • Manuscript should be submitted in Word format.
  • Writing should be clear, logical, and free from typographical or grammatical errors.
  • Include a 150-200-word, non-technical summary of the paper for the summary page as well as a 40-60-word summary for the website.

Structure and Style

  • Appropriate structure of submissions will vary depending on the research field. The manuscript should be of similar style and structure to that of typical articles published in professional journals.
  • In general, your submission might include sections for an Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, References, and Figures/Tables.
  • Supplementary Materials may be submitted along with manuscript.

Figures and Tables

  • Figures should be included at the end of the main text or in the Supplementary Information document, if needed.
  • All figures must be appropriately referenced and include legends in text format.
  • Tables should be submitted in text format.
  • For plots and graphs, axes should be clearly marked and legible. Figures should be clearly labeled if applicable.
  • If a manuscript is selected or seriously considered for publication, the editorial staff will request for high resolution figures.

References

  • Citations should be parenthetical (Author, Year) and embedded within the main text.
  • References should be formatted as follows: Authors (Year). Title. Journal/Book. Volume, Page Numbers.
  • Example:
    • Noctor, S.C., Martinez-Cerdeno, V., Ivic, L., and Kriegstein, A.R. (2004). Cortical neurons arise in symmetric and asymmetric division zones and migrate through specific phases. Nature Neuroscience 7, 136–144.

Submission Guidelines for Content Articles

1) Critical Research Analysis (CRA) The CRA is a way for anyone in the Harvard community to write a piece describing a recently published (past 12 months) primary research article.

  • Audience: The piece should be accessible for the undergraduate scientific community, but also relevant for researchers in the field of inquiry
  • Word Count (final piece): Approximately 1200 words
  • Proposal submission format: A paragraph (200-500 words) describing the most crucial findings of the primary research article, as well as an explanation why this piece warrants presentation to the Harvard community.

2) In-Depth Feature (IDF) The IDF is similar to the CRA in that it is fundamentally an analysis of multiple primary research articles. However, the IDF differs completely from the CRA in its scope. The IDF is an analysis of the progress and frontiers of a scientific field, rather than a specific research paper.

  • Audience: The piece is more geared towards students and trainees currently conducting research in the field being described, so accessibility to a general audience is not as emphasized.
  • Word Count: 1000 to 2000 words
  • Proposal submission format: A paragraph (200-500 words) presenting the primary research articles, to be discussed, as well as how this collection of papers constitutes a significant advancement of the field.

3) Cutting-Edge Research (CER) The CER is a type of IDF – the CER is also a critical analysis of primary research.  However, the CER is an analysis of primary research papers published by Harvard-affiliated faculty members.

  • Audience: The piece is more geared towards students and trainees currently conducting research in the field being described, so accessibility to a general audience is not as emphasized.
  • Word Count: 1000 to 2000 words
  • Proposal submission format: A paragraph (200-500 words) presenting the primary research articles, as well as proposals as to how the writer will ensure that voices from the Harvard community will be integrated: interviews from undergraduates/graduate students doing research in that field), or quotes from Harvard faculty members who published the articles.

4) Faculty Profile/Q&A (FP) This piece requires the writer to conduct an interview (preferably in-person) with the researcher. The researcher can be anyone from the Harvard ecosystem, including all graduate schools and the medical school, as long as they are/have been engaged in research.

  • Audience: Undergraduate research community
  • Word Count: Varies, depending on the length of the interview
  • Proposal submission format: A paragraph (100+ words) indicating 1) the individual to be interviewed, 2) why they would be valuable for the Harvard community to hear about, and 3) why it’s timely to profile this faculty member.

5) Book Review (BR) The BR is a summary and subsequent analysis of a recently released (last 6 months) book that is relevant to the undergraduate research community.

  • Audience: The piece is more geared towards students and trainees currently conducting research in the field being described, so accessibility to a general audience is not as emphasized.
  • Word Count: 1000 to 1500 words
  • Proposal submission format: A paragraph (100+ words) indicating why this book would be valuable for the Harvard community to read, as well as how the writer will ensure the piece would ensure that the book will be subject to critical review.

6) Editorial THURJ occasionally publishes editorials from faculty members and undergraduates with a clear and relevant argument that the content board believes will benefit the undergraduate community.

  • Audience: Varies
  • Word Count: Varies
  • Proposal submission format: A paragraph (300-600 words) indicating: 1) what the argument is, 2) the evidence that the writer plans to use to support it, 3) why it’s critical for the community to understand, and 4) any possible conflicts of interest.

7) Online Content Although most of the time and energy of the content board during the semester is spent on the 4-5 print articles, we always accept solicitations for online blog posts throughout the semester. The tone of a blog post is much less formal, as the audience is global.

  • Audience: Varies
  • Word Count: Varies
  • Proposal submission format: A paragraph (100+ words) describing the topic and which sources the writer plans to use.